Sign up for cow college
Email Print


Advanced Master Beef and Cow College
The Advanced Master Beef program is for those Master Beef Producers (MBP) which participated in the original program from 2004-2007. To continue your TAEP cost share program, they MBP graduates must attend the upcoming Advanced MBP sessions. Last year, many of you will remember the popular "Cow College" series of meetings that dealt with everything from reproduction to forages. This year's slate promises to be the most informative and better yet! All meetings except the January 8th meeting will be held at the Centertown Community Center located at 92 Gilbert Street McMinnville. All sessions will begin at 6:30 pm and will include a meal. This year's slate of topics and speakers are listed on page 2:

Thursday, January 8th - Dr. Andrew Griffith: "Trends, issues, and emerging issues affecting the beef market". Dr. Griffith is the latest addition to the UT Extension Department of Agricultural Economics. If you have never heard him speak, you are in for a treat. This meeting will be in conjunction with the Mid State Producers Annual Meeting and will be held at the Woodbury Lions Club Building in Woodbury.

Thursday, January 15th - Mr. Larry Moorehead: "Forages, and the importance of Hay Storage." Mr. Moorehead is the popular Extension Agent in Lynchburg. He has focused his career around improving forages and conducted the first research project dealing with hay loss and storage in Tennessee.

Thursday, January 22nd - Dr. Neal Schrick: "Reproduction Made Simple". Professor and Department Head, Animal Science; UTK, Spend an evening with one of the world's best known Animal Science researchers. Dr. Schrick will break down the reproductive process, explain the role of hormones and how that physiology can help the cow/calf producer as well as discuss economical methods of estrus synchronization and timed insemination. Many of you will know Dr. Schrick from his work with Millie, the first Jersey cloned from an adult cell.

Thursday, January 29th - Dr. Lew Strickland: "Overall herd health for the cow/calf producer" Dr. Lew is our new Extension Veterinarian. He comes to us with a world of knowledge from years of private practice and with Auburn University College of Medicine. Dr. Strickland will offer unique insight to venereal diseases of cattle and how to prevent them. Dr. Lew is one of the most knowledgeable presenters that I have ever heard possessing an uncanny ability to take a tough subject and make it much more understandable.

Thursday, February 5th - Bruce Steelman and Lt. Billy Prater. "Working Facilities and Transportation Issues" Come and learn first - hand some of the "tricks of the trade" regarding working facilities and Transportation issues. Mr. Steelman is an Extension Agent with 30 years of experience in the beef cattle field having worked with hundreds of farmers over the course of his career. He has first-hand working knowledge of what works and what doesn't. Lt. Prater is a veteran of the Tennessee Highway Patrol, and has seen it all. In addition to serving to make our roads safe, he is one of us, a cattleman himself and can provide a unique look at what we can do to improve our methods when it comes to safe transportation.
We are looking forward to a great schedule for this year's "Cow College". These meetings are an opportunity all beef producers, especially those seeking 50% cost share in TAEP. If you completed the original Master Beef Program between 2004 through 2007, you must complete the Advanced Master Beef Program before May 1st 2015 in order to continue the 50% cost share for the Tennessee Agriculture Enhancement Program. In order to register for the Advanced Master Beef producer simply drop by the Cannon County Extension Office and sign up. The cost of the Advanced Master Beef Certification is $75.00.

Frost Brings The Probability of Prussic Acid Poisoning
Generally, about the middle of October is when the "first frost" occurs. Following frost, cattle producers need to be cautioned about the possibility of Prussic acid poisoning occurring.
Plants, such as Johnson grass and those in the sorghum family, are damaged by a light frost and produce prussic aid eventually cyanide. The bad news is that this is very toxic. On the other hand, the "good news" is that it will leave the plant in 10 to 14 days. The other problem is that after the first frost another is likely to occur before the passing of the 14 day- period. To be on the safe side, the "day count" should be started over. If the forage is harvested for hay or silage, the feed will be safe to feed when the 10-14 days have passed.


Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: