Hunter: Final 4 raises questions
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DAVID HUNTER
Courier Contributor
The 2015 NCAA Final Four is now set in both the men's and women's divisions.

Once again, each of the postseason collegiate playoffs has had its share of thrilling, exciting action. But, just like in football, I believe some of the best teams are being left out just because they do not have the same name recognition as the so-called power conferences.
Also, those mid-major schools - even those with good records like the undefeated Princeton women's squad -- get punished with higher seeds than they deserve.Speaking of the Lady Tigers from the Ivy League, they had one of the best basketball teams in the nation this season and did not lose a regular season game while running through their league with ease. So, what do they get for an undefeated season? They were rewarded a No. 8 seed in the Spokane Region, which is really disrespectful to all the players and coaches who worked so hard this season to achieve that special record. On top of that. Princeton had to play No. 1 seed Maryland in the second round, who ended their magical season March 23 on their home floor.

Speaking of the Lady Tigers from the Ivy League, they had one of the best basketball teams in the nation this season and did not lose a regular season game while running through their league with ease. So, what do they get for an undefeated season? They were rewarded a No. 8 seed in the Spokane Region, which is really disrespectful to all the players and coaches who worked so hard this season to achieve that special record. On top of that. Princeton had to play No. 1 seed Maryland in the second round, who ended their magical season March 23 on their home floor. Of course, the NCAA Women's Tournament Committee's excuse for Princeton's high seed is that they did not play a tough enough non-conference schedule. My response is how they can improve their schedule when none of the so-called power conferences schools will play them at all. What are teams like Princeton and some mid-major men's teams like Murray State and Old Dominion, supposed to do in this situation? Each of them should have gotten into the tourney this season.

Of course, the NCAA Women's Tournament Committee's excuse for Princeton's high seed is that they did not play a tough enough non-conference schedule. My response is how they can improve their schedule when none of the so-called power conferences schools will play them at all. What are teams like Princeton and some mid-major men's teams like Murray State and Old Dominion, supposed to do in this situation? Each of them should have gotten into the tourney this season.First, these NCAA officials, who run both football and basketball, need to have some meetings to discuss this issue. And then, they need to grow a backbone and tell these power conference schools to start scheduling more competitive games between the mid-majors and the power ones.

First, these NCAA officials, who run both football and basketball, need to have some meetings to discuss this issue. And then, they need to grow a backbone and tell these power conference schools to start scheduling more competitive games between the mid-majors and the power ones.
Instead of resolving this issue, we are still going to have this problem every year when the postseason is announced in either football or basketball.
Meanwhile, officials from the so-called Big Six conferences will cite the addition of basketball postseason events like the NIT and CIT as a way of rewarding mid-major schools for having great regular seasons. Honestly, that is nice, and I am glad both the MTSU men's and women's basketball teams got to participate in those tournaments this season, but nothing beats playing for a chance to win the NCAA national championship.
Then there is the money factor. For example, certain schools like UCLA, which barely made the men's tournament in 2015, are included because they bring in more money and have more fans than a team like Murray State, which deserved to, but did not earn a spot. Sadly some people disagree with this viewpoint like ESPN's No. 1 college basketball analyst Jay Bilas. Honestly, I do not enjoy Bilas' work for many reasons and in particular for his unending support for his alma mater Duke.

Sadly some people disagree with this viewpoint like ESPN's No. 1 college basketball analyst Jay Bilas. Honestly, I do not enjoy Bilas' work for many reasons and in particular for his unending support for his alma mater Duke.
When, tournament time comes around I really cannot stand Bias, because he believes all of the at-large bids should go to the programs from the Power Six. Each year he gets proven wrong during the tournament as you have teams like VCU, Gonzaga and Wichita State upset the bigger name schools and sometimes advance all the way to the Final Four.

In the future, the tournament selection committees in both sports need to a better job of watching and studying all of the teams, not just the ones from the Big Six. From now on, they need to pick the best teams for the field of 64 or 68 instead of the most popular ones, especially for the at-large berths. The tournament is already very popular around this nation, just imagine how much the event would grow, if they would change the way they select the bracket.

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